If you wish to rent the property in a shared rental agreement, you must use one of our ASTs designed for the rental of the entire property in a contract. Typically, this is used when renting the property to families or a group of friends. Using an AST contract is usually the safest way to rent a room in a house or apartment where other tenants don`t rent together. Joint rentals are most popular for groups that do not change during the lease, for example.B. families or student groups for which all adults must sign the lease (1). You have the great advantage of “joint and several liability” for landlords, which means that all tenants are responsible for all costs, both in groups and individually – that is, if the landlord could only find one tenant, he could find all the arrears of a tenant or their guarantor, if there is one, or if only one tenant is late, As has been said, the advice of the Of all the others. Finally, it should be borne in mind that as an investor and lessor, you may encounter other types of rentals – although they are all much rarer than AST. The maximum number of people who can maintain a common interest on land is 4 (Trustees Act 1924 s34) If there are more than 4 common tenants, the first 4 must be classified as tenants, with the following residents included in the agreement. A special contract has been developed for this purpose by Legalhelpers – see:legalhelpers.co.uk (2) Individual tenants in an apartment building can sign a standard AST contract, provided that it is specified which part or room is intended for the exclusive property of that tenant. Ideally, a plan with the sinking in red should be annexed to the treaty. (3) Relevant case law on several premises occupied as licensing are: Street Mountford (1985), Uratemp Ventures Ltd v Collins (2001), A.G.

Securities v Vaughan (1988) and Antodiades v Villiers (1988). The most important of these, which supports the case of licensing owners in multiple squatters and which, despite its age, is still considered a key case and a legitimate right, A.G. Securities v Vaughan (1988). In this case, it was an owner who rented rooms in a property with licenses. The House of Lords (the highest court at the time) decided that it was a licence and not a lease; the key principle was that the owner had not leased the property to the wholly-owned residents or any part of it.. . .

Andrew Verboncouer • (920) 562-9601 • andrewverbs@gmail.com@averbs